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20110701
20110731
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WETA 15
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English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
by trying to throw a plate of shaving cream at rupert murdoch. following the murdoch's rebecca brook who's resign head of operations last friday and arrest and questions by police on sunday. brooks, a former editor of news of the world denied prior knowledge of the phone alletions but apologized to the victims. >> it was cruel and i have regrets. just the idea that phone access was by someone of the news of the world is abhorrent to me as it is to everyone in this room and it's ultimate regret the speed in which we have found out and tried to find out the bottom of the investigations have been too slow. i think james a rupert both accepted that earlier and we're endeavoring to continue to continue to investigate. but of course there are regrets. don't know anyone in their right mind who would authorized no sanction approval for anyone listening to the voice mails of those circumstances. i don't know anyon who would think it was the right and proper thing to do at this time or at any time. >> charlie: also appearing s sir paul hnson the head of scotland yard who resigned sunday. the heari
, and bang, we have that. there you are. is this going to do us any damage? rupert murdoch, this scandal? >> aside from the scandal, i killed that for the journalists. if, and when, the other shoe drops on the side of the ocean, eric holder's justice department is considering subpoenas. i do not think it will be as fun and dramatic as what we have seen out of london, but i do think there is another shoe to drop here. >> i think it has sort of appalled people how close we get to our sources. in england, this was out of control, where the government was being run by a news organization. politicians were terrified of the murdoch operation. some of my friends work for him and i know something about it. they took it for granted that they would go over to downing street to talk to the prime minister. you are never going to be able to pop into the oval office and tell the president what he should do. >> i will never be accused of being too cozy with the president. part of this story is who is covered which aspects of the story? part of it is about rupert murdoch. part of it is about "news of th
to andrew edgecliff johon about you rupert murdoch and the news corporation case in london. >> i tell you today is not the end of the story but with the resignation of rebecca brooks on tuesday, this is a story which will run for months if not years with police investigations, judicial inquiries, lawsuits and any number of other threats still piling up against the company, but it's a significant day. >> charlie: the president's press conference, global implications for europe and the united states and the rupert murdoch case. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: every story needs a hero we can all root for. who beats the odds and comes out on top. additional funding provided by these funders: but this isn't just a hollywood storyline. it's happening every da all across america. every time a storefront opens. or the midnight oil is burned. or when someone chases a dream, not just a dollar. they are small business owners. so if you wanna root for a real hero, support small business. shop small. additional funding pvided by these funders: captioning sponsored b rose commun
in hiring andy coleson. rupert murdoch, his son james and news international chief executive rebekah brooks have been summoned to appear before a parliamentary committee next tuesday. questions have begun to arise about the impact this scandal will have on the future of murdoch's global media empire and what it pact it will have on british politics and the future of prime minister david cameron. his press spokesman andrew coleson, former editor of "news of the world" has resigned and has been arrested. joining me from london, alan rusbridger, the editor of "the guardian," catherine mayor, "time" magazine london bureau chief. the cover story on "time" is hers and alister campbell, former communications director to prime minister tony blair. joining me frocambridge, john burns, the "new york times" london bureau chief. here with me in new york is roger cohen oor"new ykim tes" t and josh tie ren tie ren jell of blooplberg business week. where is the story as we speak? >> everyday brings another startling turn in this story. todas big turn was the dpe sigs by rupert and james murdoch james bein
, including an attack on media mogul rupert murdoch by a prankster armed with a plate of shaving cream. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we examine today's proceedings where the head of news corp said he was shocked, appalled and ashamed, but not responsible for the misdeeds. we talk to john burns of "the new york times" and david folkenflik of npr. >> brown: then, we ask nuclear regulatory commission chair gregory jaczko if u.s. reactors could withstand an earthquake like the one that devastated japan. >> ifill: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on the challenges and the troubles facing one of the world's largest democracies. >> it made tremendous strides politically and economically but still struggles with corruption. >> brown: kwame holman updates the budget battles as the house and senate offer dueling plans for reducing the deficit. >> ifill: and judy woodruff explores the deadline-driven deal cutting underway with political editor david chalian. >> brown: plus, in a season of tornadoes, floods and more, we get some poetic perspec
circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper, "the news of the world," that was to become his very profitable pride and joy. >> 4 give the individual by all means, but you cannot forget. >> 42 years later, he might well have made the same remarks about the person at the paper became fairly rotten and whose action shocked the nation. the paper, which has been printed for 168 years, became indelibly linked with the worst practices in journalism. james murdoch concluded it could not be amended. >> clearly, practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and that i believe in. and that this company believes in. this company has been a great investor in journalism, a greater investor in media in general, and it is something that we believe very strongly and. clearly, certain activities did not live up to those standards. that is a matter of great regret for me personally and for the company. >> there were revelations about alleged hijacking of a mobile phone, and of the f
joined by a senior business writer for bloomberg news. -- this could impact the rupert murdoch empire, i am joined by a senior business writer for bloomberg news. what can they say that will reassure shareholders? >> i think shareholders will want to hear that the worst is past. there's a sense among shareholders -- viavoice given rupert murdoch -- they have always given rupert murdoch a bit of a break. there has always been a bit of a murdoch discount thinking he is going to do what he wants to do and do not always what is best for shareholders. they've given him a break because he has a good view long- term of where the company is going. now he and his management team look like a group that is not in front of the news. they continue to get hammered by events. they are not prepared for it. they're constantly reacting. i think shareholders will want to see that the worst is behind them and they have their arms around this and know where it will go from here. >> is there any threat to the murdochs themselves? are their personal reputations so damaged it is now a liability for management?
who have said that police do not want to investigate what he has done. rupert murdoch issued a statement describing what had happened as deplorable and unacceptable. he stated that "our company must fully cooperate with the police and said that what happened under rebekah brooks' leadership." she was editor of the "news of the world," at the time some of the hacking. she was apparently away at the time. murdoch's enemies have long claimed that whoever is in power is the real puppet master. tonight, he, they, no one knows how this will end. >> joining me now from london is the deputy prime minister went tony blair was in power. 45 of his mobile phone messages were hacked into. this is a very sorry tale. it goes back to 2006 when your own messages were broken into. how evasive was that? >> the police kept in mind that that was so. i had to go to the court and force them to commit and setup a new inquiry. that is finding all of disinformation. the information was available before. why didn't the police act on it instead of the nine that my phone messages had been broken into? no
of the power passing away in some respect. i don't know when, i don't know how quickly, but rupert murdoch did ok like a spent force. james, i've heard quite divided responses on how h performed. if i re a shareholder, i wouldn't be too happy about him. i thought that -- that he was -- he seemed evasive and repetitive, which to be fair to him i think when he weing asked also repetiti questions, in that surroundingt wasn't very surprising, but he wasn't -- he dn't -- he didn't rely, i think, equate himlf thnough honor to assure the succession. so i'm rather thinking that this is the beginning of the end of an era. >> the judgment is still out on that. i think that it took about an hour for rupert murdoch, who really is a -- as we know a formidable figure -- to at least wake up or at least become engaged. i think heook some time to adjust to the fact that there he was, being pummeled, having questions asked of him. that's not the role he's accustomed of. he's normally chairman, in charge, asking the questions. so that was a little bit of a psychological shock. he did look detached, rd of hearing
for rupert murdoch's news corp from ned temko of the "london observer." >> ifill: then, we examine president obama's pick to lead a new consumer protection agency. >> woodruff: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on a nation coming to grips with mental health disorders even as its institutions lock up and chain patients. >> this enormous country has almost no psychiatrists,çç leaving the mentally ill with very few options for treatment. >> ifill: kwame holman brings us the latest on the showdown over raising the government's borrowing limit. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown talks to legendary concert pianist leon fleisher about overcoming a disability that nearly silenced his career. >> if there was a way that i could remain active in music without playing with two hands, well, i had to find it. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour."çç major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy and improve schools. >>
-torn country. >> ifill: ray suarez explores what's next for rupert murdoch's media empire, as the investigation expands into the phone hacking scandal. >> woodruff: we update budget negotiations in washington and examine the consequences if lawmakers fail to raise the debt ceiling by the august 2 deadline. >> ifill: tom bearden tells the story of citizen scientists-- some quite young-- on the hunt for ladybugs. >> oh, they're beauties. we can't keep them, sweetie. we're just going to take their picture. >> woodruff: and we reflect on the life of betty ford, as friends, family, and dignitaries gather to pay ibute to the former first lady, who died friday. >> i'm sure they will remember me in recovery and perhaps with equal rights amendment. if i hadn't been married to my husband, i never would have had the voice that i did. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternat
-- will be its last. in sun valley, idaho today, media mogul rupert murdoch-- owner of parent company news corporation-- had no comment on the tabloid's closure. but his son james murdoch said in a statement to staffers: fundamentally, action taken a number of years ago by certain individuals, in what had been a good newsroom have breached the trust that the news of the world has with its readers. >> warner: those mistakes first came to light in 2005 when "news of the world" was accused of hacking into cell phone messages of members of the royal family and famous actors. other revelations followed, amid an ongoing but fitful police inquiry. this week, public outrage exploded with leaks from that inquiry, that the family of a murdered teenager milly dowler had been victimized. a private detective working for "news of the world" allegedly hacked her voice mail after she disappeared in 2002, and deleted some messages. the activity on her phone account gave them false hope she was still alive. then yesterday, relatives of victims of london's so-called 7/7 terror attacks in 2005 said they'd bee
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)